The Lickerish Quartet announce “Threesome Vol. 2” EP

Ex-Jellyfish members Roger Joseph Manning Jr. (Beck, Air, Cheap Trick, Imperial Drag), Tim Smith (Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds, The Finn Brothers, Sheryl Crow, Umajets) and Eric Dover (Imperial Drag, Slash’s Snakepit, Alice Cooper, Sextus), aka The Lickerish Quartet, are standing by their promise to their fans to release more new music before the end of 2020.

Today they’re excited to announce their highly anticipated “THREESOME VOL. 2” EP, which will be released Jan. 8, 2021 via Stranger Danger Records and Tapes. Pre-orders will be available starting Friday, December 4 here. The first single and video, “Snollygoster Goon,” can be seen now on the band’s official YouTube page and streamed on Spotify, Apple Music and Amazon.

In addition to the new music, The Lickerish Quartet is offering unprecedented access to the band thanks to a plethora of exciting “Experiences,” which will be available for purchase on their official website. These exclusive offers include: “Perform / Record On Your Song,” “Co-Write a Song With Us,” “Video Chat,” “Music Lesson,” and many others.

It’s the follow-up to “THREESOME VOL. 1,” lauded by critics as “a masterpiece” which was released May 15, 2020 via The Lickerish Quartet/Label Logic, as distributed by Ingrooves and can be purchased and streamed on all digital outlets.

With song titles like “Snolllygoster Goon,” “The Dream That Took Me Over,” “Sovereignty Blues,” and “Do You Feel Better?” Manning, Smith, and Dover’s undeniable chemistry can once again be found throughout “THREESOME VOL. 2.” The songs formed from the same sessions that begun in 2017 offer a slinky and feisty landscape of temptation, freedom of thought, hope and dreams, and a shout out to all who game the systems. An edgy second round of soaring vocals, angular guitars, and pulsing drums, enveloped by timeless keyboard arrangements requires multiple listens to appreciate fully. Manning, Dover and Smith ruminate on these new songs:

“Do You Feel Better?” as told by Tim Smith:
A romp along the primrose path of temptations, internal and external, real or imagined, the tiny demons we dance with throughout our lives.
A pulsing bass and hypnotic guitar rhythm plays like the backing band to a striptease you’ve sneaked into, and don’t know where to sit, but all are welcome!
Some things are more dangerous than others, of course, but this song is sort of a combination of letting your guard down, because of preconceived notions of what’s right or wrong, and justification  of actions you think you understand to have under control. Who knows? Experiences do give us perspective, and this song tries to play between the id and superego–a Screwtape letter demon, and an Angel of Mercy.

“Sovereignty Blues” as told by Roger Joseph Manning Jr.:
“Fears fire’s all they’re fanning, but I won’t light up their fuse.” A tale as old as humanity. Group control over another through the tried and true tactic of fear. And always partnered with a fatal dose of “divide and conquer.” But who’s actually pulling the levers and pushing the buttons of the propaganda machine behind the Wizard of Oz’ curtain of crowd control, so to speak? Irrelevant. Ultimately, the perennial question for any person, provided they value sovereignty above all else, is: am I going to choose love over fear, peace over chaos, and God over the ego in any given moment? Everything can be taken from a man but one thing (to quote Viktor Frankl): “The last of the human freedoms, to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.” And with that in mind, grab a torch, march to your own drum, and sing along.

“The Dream That Took Me Over” as told by Eric Dover:
You are driving without a destination lured by the wanderlust of your own making.  You turn up the stereo volume and continue along, moonlight reflecting off the chrome of your vehicle.
We invite you to put the top down and take a ride into the inner dialectic of our conflicted protagonist as we answer the question: Is there equilibrium in the chaos or does science hold the key?

“Snollygoster Goon” as told by Eric Dover:
A frenetic forensic foray into classic old as civilization themes involving
greed, graft and corruption as applied to any political sphere.
The music is Adderall based in theory to reflect the absolute
breakneck speed at which the corruption flourishes. The snake oil salesman kissing babies, the saccharine unimaginative public image.

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